Jun
20
6:05 PM18:05

"Innovation4All, Why Diversity in Open Source Will Lead to Better Products for Everyone" by Quincy Iheme of Comcast

Open Source technologies have paved the way for an explosion of advancements in products. The core component of open source that drives its growth is the (free) contributions from many developers to many different projects across the world. However, contributions to open source remain one of the unconventional and non-diverse areas of the technology industry.

A recent Github survey of over 5,500 open source users and developers from around the world shows that only 16 percent of respondents belonged to ethnic or national groups that are in the minority in the country they live in. Ninety-five percent of respondents were male, three percent were female, and the remaining respondents identified as non-binary. In the US, minority groups that including Black, Asian, and Latino programmers comprise only 34 percent of total programmers according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In this talk, I will outline the gap in open source contributions and speak to how closing the gap can help to create better software for everyone.


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Jun
20
5:25 PM17:25

"The (Legal) Evolution of Free and Open Source Licensing" by McCoy Smith

This presentation will give a brief and lighthearted summary of the way in which the legal mechanisms have evolved in free and open source licensing over the past 30+ years.  See how these licenses have adapted to various trends or developments in the legal world (copyrights, patents, contracts, etc.), and what that might mean for the future of free and open source licensing.  A brief overview of recent and potential future legal controversies will also be presented.


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Jun
20
5:10 PM17:10

"25 Years of FreeBSD and Why You Should Get Involved!" by Deb Goodkin of The FreeBSD Foundation

Did you know that FreeBSD is one of the oldest (1993), largest, and most successful open source projects in the world? FreeBSD is a free Unix-like operating system descended from Research Unix via the Berkeley Software Distribution (BSD), also known as “Berkeley Unix.” It’s known for its reliability, stability, and advanced networking and performance. In fact, if you watch Netflix, use an Apple iPhone, or play games on the Sony PlayStation, you are using FreeBSD today!

I'm going to share FreeBSD's long history, descending from the original UNIX in 1969 to where FreeBSD is at now. Once you understand FreeBSD's history, you'll learn why more individuals and companies are using FreeBSD, why you should consider using FreeBSD, and the benefits of contributing to this inclusive and welcoming open source community!


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Jun
20
4:55 PM16:55

"Become an open source contributor. You don't need to be an engineer." by Khem Raj of Comcast

The widespread notion that to participate in Open Source and to become a contributor, one has to be technical. Moreover, one has to write code and write it well. This is a poor assumption. Open source projects (like any other projects) require all kinds of expertise. This talk will cover a few different, non-code-submitting ways to contribute to open source with guidance that applies to anyone interested in contributing to open source.


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Jun
20
4:10 PM16:10

"User Unfriendly: A Practical Guide to Losing Control" by Miriam Suzanne of OddBird

The web is more than a technology, it was created with a mission statement. Design and code trends also come with attached philosophies, often unstated. As designers and developers, it’s important that we think clearly about the underlying implications of our products and our processes. We’ll explore various approaches and lessons from Miriam’s experience with creative process and audience interaction in theater, writing, art, and software. How do we balance creativity, expertise, and expectations? What does it really mean to be user friendly?


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Jun
20
3:35 PM15:35

"The Story of an Open Source Network Protocol" by Olivier Crête of Collabora

Creating a new Open Source project is always a challenge, but it's doubly challenging when the project targets an industry where proprietary software and methodologies are still seen as the norm. Taking code written as closed source and building a community around it is never easy, but it's even more difficult when none of the development team has participated in Open Source projects before. Such is the story of SRT (Secure Reliable Transport), a protocol with an Open Source implementation that has taken the television contribution environment by storm. I will tell you the story of how we helped Haivision take its internally developed SRT library and protocol and helped make it the main player in low latency transport of video.

During my talk, I'll explain the kind of things that we had to take care of when creating a new Open Source project. Starting with an evaluation of existing software, are we pointlessly re-inventing the wheel? Followed by a solid plan for a community, with an appropriate choice of license, a governance model, a communication and collaboration infrastructure. And last, but not least, a solid commitment from the main sponsor.


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Jun
20
1:20 PM13:20

"Automating Apache Traffic Control Environment Deployments with Ansible" by Jonathan Gray of Comcast

Apache Traffic Control is a set of applications designed to complement Apache Traffic Server to comprise a Content Delivery Network.  Currently, the creation of a complete production-ready CDN environment is a complex process.  I will be discussing automation leveraging Ansible and CDN environment designs to facilitate consistent and more rapid testing environment creation.


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Jun
20
12:45 PM12:45

"Open Source, Autodesk & The Academy: Building Better Visual Effects Together" by Guy Martin of Autodesk, Inc.

Due to an increased reliance on open source software in the visual effects industry, Autodesk has worked hard to improve its ability to consume, collaborate and create within the open source ecosystem to help customers build great movies. Its Open@ADSK program takes the best practices of the open source community and applies them to internal product development in support of a more open and collaborative development model.

Autodesk, like almost all companies, utilizes a lot of open source software, but is still ramping up efforts to more effectively participate and contribute back to the projects. Part of this work revolves around our work in the Academy Software Foundation (ASWF), which we played a leading role in helping create. This session will cover some of the things we've learned through our participation in ASWF (and other open source projects), as well as, talk about what we hope to accomplish in the future by working together with the rest of the open source community.


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Jun
20
11:45 AM11:45

Opening Keynote "Why the License Matters" by Jilayne Lovejoy, Attorney and Open Source Community Leader

Under the intellectual property laws that protect software, it is the license that enables sharing. Adoption of open source software is dependent on being able to communicate and comprehend license information. This talk will cover tips and best practices related to open source licensing for an open source project’s lifecycle - from the project’s creation, to receiving or making contributions, to using the project, including how the Software Package Data Exchange (SPDX) can help. By understanding the ‘why’ and ‘how’, open source developers can reduce the need for lawyers.


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